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How Much Does a Cubic Yard Weigh?

By | Last update: 28 June 2022

1 cubic yard of topsoil commonly weighs between 2,000 and 2,700 pounds, depending on composition and moisture content. Similarly, 1 cubic yard of sand commonly weighs between 2,700 and 3,300 pounds.

When calculating the weight of a cubic yard of material in pounds or tons, you need to factor in the density of the material in order to get an accurate conversion. This is because the cubic yard is a unit of volume and you're trying to convert it to a unit of weight (pounds or tons). To give an example, a cubic yard of wet concrete weighs more than a cubic yard of dry mulch because the wet concrete is denser.

We've put together a list of materials and their rough densities to assist you with your calculation. Do remember that densities will vary based upon a number of factors, from composition to moisture content. A cubic yard of dry sand will weigh less than a cubic yard of wet sand, for example. It's important to give due consideration to this when comparing the weight estimates we've listed below for dirt, gravel, topsoil, sand, concrete, mulch, etc.

To get the most accurate conversion, you're advised to obtain a density figure from the material manufacturer. The figures below should be used only as a guide estimate. You'll also find a conversion tool further down this page.

How much does a cubic yard of dirt weigh?

One cubic yard of dry dirt weighs about 1,944 pounds or 0.97 US tons, based on a density of 72 lb/ft³. When saturated, the weight can increase by as much as 50%.

How much does a cubic yard of concrete weigh?

One cubic yard of concrete (solid slab) weighs about 3,915 pounds or 1.96 US tons, based on a density of 145 lb/ft³.

How much does a cubic yard of sand weigh?

One cubic yard of sand weighs about 2,700 pounds or 1.35 US tons when dry and about 3,240 pounds or 1.62 US tons when wet.

How much does a cubic yard of gravel weigh?

One cubic yard of gravel weighs about 2,835 pounds or 1.42 US tons when dry and about 3,375 pounds or 1.69 US tons when wet.

How much does a cubic yard of topsoil weigh?

One cubic yard of topsoil can weigh between 2,000 and 2,700 pounds (1 and 1.35 US tons), depending on moisture content.

How much does a cubic yard of mulch weigh?

One cubic yard of dry bark mulch weighs about 506 pounds or 0.25 US tons. A cubic yard of dry woodchip mulch weighs about 674 pounds or 0.34 US tons. The higher the moisture content, the more the mulch will weigh.

1 cubic yard to pounds, tons

Material Pounds (lb) US tons Metric tonnes
Asphalt (crushed)
45 lb/ft³
1215 0.61 0.55
Asphalt (liquid)
65 lb/ft³
1755 0.88 0.8
Cement (portland)
94 lb/ft³
2538 1.27 1.15
Concrete
145 lb/ft³
3915 1.96 1.78
Dirt
72 lb/ft³
1944 0.97 0.88
Gravel (loose, dry)
85 lb/ft³
2295 1.15 1.04
Gravel (dry, 1/4 to 2 in)
105 lb/ft³
2835 1.42 1.29
Gravel (wet 1/4 to 2 in)
125 lb/ft³
3375 1.69 1.53
Gravel (with sand)
120 lb/ft³
3240 1.62 1.47
Limestone (crushed)
90 lb/ft³
2430 1.22 1.1
Limestone (low density)
120 lb/ft³
3240 1.62 1.47
Limestone (high density)
160 lb/ft³
4320 2.16 1.96
Mulch (bark)
18.728 lb/ft³
506 0.25 0.23
Mulch (woodchip)
24.97 lb/ft³
674 0.34 0.31
Sand (dry)
100 lb/ft³
2700 1.35 1.22
Sand (loose)
90 lb/ft³
2430 1.22 1.1
Sand (wet)
120 lb/ft³
3240 1.62 1.47
Topsoil
100 lb/ft³
2700 1.35 1.22
Topsoil (saturated)
115 lb/ft³
3105 1.55 1.41
Based upon density estimates (ref)

To calculate the weight of a number of cubic yards of materials, we've included a handy calculator for you below.

Convert cubic yards to pounds or tons

Convert cubic yards of materials to pounds or tons. This forms part of the cubic yards to tons converter.

Please choose a material OR enter your own density figure. A density is required to convert cubic yards to weight. A cubic yard of dirt weighs less than a cubic yard of concrete.

add own
Calculation results will appear here.

References:
  1. Engineering Toolbox and simetric.co.uk

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